I’m thrilled ! I’m a {code} Catalyst !

Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes

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Carrying a slogan “Code Open, Deploy Anywhere”, {code} by DellEMC is an organization of open source engineers focused on next generation infrastructure that effectively enables DellEMC to be relevant in Dev Ops and Open Source communities through contribution, engagement and technical solution leadership. With sustainable organic growth leading close to 2000+ members in last 1 year, over 30+ open source projects(like goscaleio, goxtremio, Metalnx, ECS-Dashboard, LabBuildr, Unity-PowerShell), increase in the number of external community contributors and several community success stories , the {code} community is all set to increasingly embrace the open source model through active engagement with the social developers and slowly  influencing with the active participation and contributions across the globe.

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Today, the {code} community announced “{code} Catalysts“- a mix blend of passionate, creative and forward-thinking industry experts and community leaders known for their strong convictions towards the importance of open source technology. These community experts are passionate to share knowledge and technical expertise with the open source community in the form of speakers at technical conferences, contributing training documentations, sharing their experiences through blogs, twitter and through local Meetups. Driven by their community spirit and the quest for knowledge, these community experts have a strong desire to get their hands on new & exciting technologies.These community experts are nominated based on their impeccable engagement and contribution towards the {code} community.

The {code} Catalyst Program is primarily focused on promoting thought-leading members of the open source community by creating a candid dialogue between open source advocates, developers and project managers across company boundaries. The program goal is to create an ecosystem of innovative open source advocates who lead and advance emerging technology to support software-based infrastructures.

Currently, there are 18 {code} Catalysts nominated for this programme, bringing the technical expertise from biggies like Intel, IBM, DellEMC, Red Hat,  Docker, Acquia, Sirius, Blockbridge etc. I’m completely thrilled to be part of this amazing community experts. So far, it has been memorable journey working with some of the most influential advocates in the Enterprise IT. Last year, I was honored with “Docker Captain” by Docker Inc. and it has been amazing experience of interaction with Docker community users through online & local Meetups, tech-talks, conferences & slack channel.This year I look forward to contribute in the field of containers and data persistence through blogs, online & local Meetups.

Can’t wait to share this awesome GIFY from one of my colleague

A Message directly from {code} Catalysts desk…

“…With a mission to educate the community about the next-gen open source infrastructure and sharing the real-life experiences with the large community, we  – the {code} catalysts are all set to contribute, engage and make open source community, an exciting world to live in .

Feel free to talk to us at https://codecommunity.slack.com/

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Assessing the current state of Docker Engine & Tools on Raspberry Pi

Estimated Reading Time: 7 minutes

Are you planning to speak or conduct your next Docker Workshop on Raspberry Pi’s? Still curious to know whether the tools like Docker Machine, Docker Compose, Dockerfile, 1.12 Swarm Mode, High Availability & Load Balancing are compatible and good to be demonstrated to the workshop audience? In case you want to know the current state of Docker containers on Raspberry Pi, then you are at the right place. For the next 1/2 hour time, I will be talking about what Docker images, tools, networking and security features are supported on Raspberry Pi box.

Let’s have a quick glimpse of what popular tools works today with Docker Engine on Pi box. Below listed are few lists of tools and applications which currently works great on Raspberry Pi. Please remember that this is NOT official support Matrix from Docker Inc. Also, the versions specified are the latest tested and verified personally. I just verified the tools functionality so as to keep it ready before the workshop.

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The  State of Docker Engine

In my previous blog post, I talked about “Docker 1.12.1 on Raspberry Pi 3 in 5 minutes” where I demonstrated on how to get started with Docker 1.12.1 Installation on Pi box for the first time. With 1.12.1, a FIRST ARM Debian package was officially made available and there was tremendous amount of interest among the Docker users. This time I tried my hands with the latest experimental build, Docker Engine version 1.12.3 on top of the latest Raspbian Jessie Lite version.

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Docker Engine looked quite stable as I was able to try out basic Docker commands like exec, run, attach etc., creating Dockerfile and building the image was smooth on Pi box. Running and stopping the containers works as smooth as you experience on VMs on your Virtual box or Cloud instance. This release should be a good baseline for demonstration of the latest Docker CLI to the workshop audience(for both beginners & advanced level users)

The State of Docker Compose

Docker Compose is a tool for defining and running multi-container Docker applications. With Compose, you use a Compose file to configure your application’s services.Major features like multiple isolated environments on a single host, building up Microservice architecture makes Compose a powerful tool. I picked up the latest stable Docker Compose version 1.8 so as to check and verify the latest compose functionality.

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I followed this link to get Docker Compose version 1.8 installed on my Pi box. It went smooth and required no tweaking at all. I tried running WordPress application(running maria-db, Apache and PHP) inside docker containers using docker-compose and it just went fine.

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The overall experience with Docker Compose was positive. Tried dozens of docker-compose CLIs like exec and run and it worked great. In case you are planning to demonstrate Compose 1.8, go ahead and this should be a great tool to demonstrate the concept of Microservices to the workshop users.

The State of Docker 1.12 Swarm Mode

I verified the functionality of Swarm Mode on Docker 1.12.3 and it just works flawless. I tested the basic functionality in setting up the master and worker nodes and it worked great:

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One just need to add the worker nodes as suggested in the above command and it just worked as expected. I tried few features like workers leaving the cluster using $docker swarm leave option and it worked as expected. Creating networks and attaching services to the overlay network is one feature which I haven’t yet tried out. Will update this space once I try my hands-on with the overlay network.

The State of Docker 1.12 High Availability:

Demonstrating HA using Swarm Mode is always an interesting stuffs to do with the container clustering.  I had 5 nodes clustering setup with 5 Raspberry Pi – one master and other 4 worker nodes. I took the same WordPress application and demonstrated on 5 node cluster. I scaled out the WordPress application container from 10 to 30 and then tried stopping few containers on the 3rd Pi. Automatically the new containers came up with a new IDs balancing across the swarm cluster. I haven’t tested the master node failure on Pi box but I believe it should work with minimal 3 number of master nodes on Raspberry Pi boxes.

The State of Operating Systems Docker Image:

Last September, I built the first CentOS 7.2 ARM docker image on Raspberry Pi 3 which I described in detail through my blog. It was well appreciated effort and quite accepted by Docker community. I was trying to build Dell legacy application for ARM architecture and the legacy application was tightly coupled to CentOS 7.x distribution. Hence, just thought to pick up necessary packages from Fedora repository and successfully built the required CentOS 7.2 Docker image. Other than CentOS, Ubuntu, Alpine Linux and Arch-Linux are few of the most popular Docker OS image which can be demonstrated to the workshop audience.

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The State of Tools(Monitoring, Management):

Two months back, I published a blog post on “Turn Your Raspberry Pi into Out-of-band Monitoring Device using Docker“. I pushed Nagios Docker image for the first time for ARM architecture which you can use freely from Dockerhub. Demonstrating the monitoring tool like Nagios running inside Docker on Raspberry Pi can be a great example of how Docker reduces the complexity in packaging the huge application.

Talking about UI & Management of Docker containers, I came across Portainer – A Simple Management UI for Docker .Portainer is very young project but gaining a huge popularity due to its easy to use UI, lightweight and responsive user interface.

[Updated: 11/21/2016] – Good News for Pi users – Portainer now has official support for ARM arch using the Docker image portainer/portainer:arm ! Portainer recently added more features to support swarm mode services in their latest release.

Setting up Portainer is a matter of one-liner command(as shown below):

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That’s it. All you need to do is open your browser and point out to http://<IP>:9000.Portainer provides you a lightweight management UI which allows you to easily manage your Docker host or Swarm cluster.

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One of the most attractive offering from Portainer Team is “Use Your Own Templates” . It allows you to rapidly deploy containers using App Templates, a glimpse of which can be found at https://raw.githubusercontent.com/portainer/templates/master/templates.json.

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In short, Portainer allows you to manage your Docker containers, images, volumes, networks and more ! It is compatible with the standalone Docker engine and with Docker Swarm.

In my future blog post, I am going to touch upon the upcoming Docker releases verified for Raspberry Pi box and its compatibility matrix. Feel free to share your thoughts through twitter(@ajeetsraina)

[clickandtweet handle=”@docker @ajeetsraina” hashtag=”#RaspberryPi #docker ” related=”@Raspberry_Pi” layout=”” position=””]Run Your Next Docker Workshop on Raspberry Pi[/clickandtweet]

 

 

What’s new upcoming in Docker Compose v1.9.0?

Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

Docker Compose has gained lots of attention in the recent past due to its easy one-liner installation(on Linux, Windows & Mac OS X), easy-to-use JSON & YAML format support , available sample docker-compose files on GITHUB  and a one-liner command to create and start all the services from your configuration. If you are looking out for Microservices implementation, Docker Compose is a great tool to get started with. With Compose, you can define and run complex application with Docker. Also, you define a multi-container application in a single file, then spin up your application in a single command which takes care of linking services together through Service Discovery.

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Docker Compose 1.9 is currently under RC4 phase and nearing the Final Release. Several new features and improvements in terms of Networking, Logging & Compose CLI has been introduced. With this release, Docker Compose version 2.1 has been introduced for the first time.This release will support the setting up of  volume labels and network labels in YAML specification. BUT there is a good news for Microsoft Windows enthusiasts. Interactive mode for docker-compose run and docker-compose exec is now supported on Windows platforms and this is surely going to help Microsoft enthusiasts to play around with the services flawlessly.

The below picture shows what major features has been introduced since last year in Docker Compose release:

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In case you are very new to Docker Compose, I suggest you to read this official documentation. If you are an experienced Compose user and curious to know how Docker Compose fits into Swarm Mode, don’t miss out my recent blog post. Under this blog post, we will look at the new features which are being introduced under Docker Compose 1.9 release.

Installation of Docker Compose v1.9

On Windows Server 2016 system, you can run the below command to get started with Docker Compose 1.9-rc4 release.

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If you are on Linux host, the installation just goes flawless as shown below:

# curl -L https://github.com/docker/compose/releases/download/1.9.0-rc3/docker-compose-`uname -s`-`uname -m` > /usr/local/bin/docker-compose

# chmod +x /usr/local/bin/docker-compose$ sudo docker-compose -vdocker-compose version 1.9.0-rc3, build fcd38d3

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Introduction of Version 2.1 YAML specification format for the first time

Docker 1.9 introduces the newer version of Docker Compose YAML specification format rightly called “Version: 2.1” for the first time. To test drive, I created a docker-compose file for my wordpress application and it just worked well.

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The docker-compose up -d just went good as shown below:

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We can have a look at the list of services running using Docker compose as shown below:

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Interactive Mode for docker exec & docker run

Though this feature has been there for Linux users quite for sometime, it has been newly introduced and supported on Windows Platform too. In case you are new to docker-compose run command, here is the simplified way to demonstrate it.

On Linux Host:

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Note: In case you are new to docker-compose config command, it is a CLI tool which validates your Docker compose file.

Cool. One can use docker-compose run command to target one service out of several services mentioned under docker-compose.yml file and interact with that particular service without any issue.

On Windows Host:

To quickly test this feature, I spun up Windows Server 2016 on Azure, installed Docker and Docker Compose and forked https://github.com/ajeetraina/Virtualization-Documentation repository which has collection of Windows Docker images. Though it was quite slow in the beginning, but once pulled bringing up services using Docker Compose was pretty quick.

NOTE: When running docker-compose, you will either need to explicitly reference the host port by adding the option “-H tcp://localhost:2375” to the end of this command (e.g. docker-compose -H “tcp://localhost:2375” or by setting your DOCKER_HOST environment variable to always use this port (e.g. $env:DOCKER_HOST=”tcp://localhost:2375”

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cmp33As shown below, the services finally were up and running and one can easily check through docker-compose ps command as shown below:

 

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Let us test docker-compose run feature now. I tried targeting the db service and running cmd command to see if it works well.

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That’s really cool. Believe me, it was quite quick in bringing up command prompt.

Support for setting volume labels and network labels in docker-compose.yml

This is an important addition to Docker compose release. There has been several ask from Docker community user to bring up this feature and Docker team has done a great job in introducing it under this release.

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If you look at the last few lines, the volume labels has been specified in the following format:

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    volume_with_labels:

        labels:

            –   “alpha=beta”

To verify if it rightly build up the container with the volume labels, one can issue the below command:

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In the upcoming posts, I will be covering more features and bug fixes introduced under Docker Compose 1.9. Keep watching this space for further updates.