Under the Hood: Demystifying Docker For Mac CE Edition

Estimated Reading Time: 6 minutes

 

Docker is a full development platform for creating containerized apps, and Docker for Mac is the most efficient way to start and run Docker on your MacBook. It runs on a LinuxKit VM and NOT on VirtualBox or VMware Fusion. It embeds a hypervisor (based on xhyve), a Linux distribution which runs on LinuxKit and filesystem & network sharing that is much more Mac native. It is a Mac native application, that you install in /Applications. At installation time, it creates symlinks in /usr/local/bin for docker & docker-compose and others, to the commands in the application bundle, in /Applications/Docker.app/Contents/Resources/bin.

One of the most amazing feature about Docker for Mac is “drag & Drop” the Mac application to /Applications to run Docker CLI and it just works flawlessly. The way the filesystem sharing maps OSX volumes seamlessly into Linux containers and remapping macOS UIDs into Linux is one of the most anticipated feature.

Few Notables Features of Docker for Mac:

  • Docker for Mac runs in a LinuxKit VM.
  • Docker for Mac uses HyperKit instead of Virtual Box. Hyperkit is a lightweight macOS virtualization solution built on top of Hypervisor.framework in macOS 10.10 Yosemite and higher.
  • Docker for Mac does not use docker-machine to provision its VM. The Docker Engine API is exposed on a socket available to the Mac host at /var/run/docker.sock. This is the default location Docker and Docker Compose clients use to connect to the Docker daemon, so you to use docker and docker-compose CLI commands on your Mac.
  • When you install Docker for Mac, machines created with Docker Machine are not affected.
  • There is no docker0 bridge on macOS. Because of the way networking is implemented in Docker for Mac, you cannot see a docker0 interface on the host. This interface is actually within the virtual machine.
  • Docker for Mac has now Multi-Architectural support. It provides binfmt_misc multi architecture support, so you can run containers for different Linux architectures, such as arm, mips, ppc64le, and even s390x.

Top 5 Exclusive Features of Docker For Mac That You Can’t Afford to Ignore

Under this blog, I will deep dive into Docker for Mac architecture and show how to access service containers running on top of LinuxKit VM.

At the base of architecture, we have hypervisor called Hyperkit which is derived from xhyve. The xhyve hypervisor is a port of bhyve to OS X. It is built on top of Hypervisor.framework in OS X 10.10 Yosemite and higher, runs entirely in userspace, and has no other dependencies. HyperKit is basically a toolkit for embedding hypervisor capabilities in your application. It includes a complete hypervisor optimized for lightweight virtual machines and container deployment. It is designed to be interfaced with higher-level components such as the VPNKit and DataKit.

Just sitting next to HyperKit is Filesystem sharing solution. The osxfs is a new shared file system solution, exclusive to Docker for Mac. osxfs provides a close-to-native user experience for bind mounting macOS file system trees into Docker containers. To this end, osxfs features a number of unique capabilities as well as differences from a classical Linux file system.On macOS Sierra and lower, the default file system is HFS+. On macOS High Sierra, the default file system is APFS.With the recent release, NFS Volume sharing has been enabled both for Swarm & Kubernetes.

There is one more important component sitting next to Hyperkit, rightly called as VPNKit. VPNKit is a part of HyperKit attempts to work nicely with VPN software by intercepting the VM traffic at the Ethernet level, parsing and understanding protocols like NTP, DNS, UDP, TCP and doing the “right thing” with respect to the host’s VPN configuration. VPNKit operates by reconstructing Ethernet traffic from the VM and translating it into the relevant socket API calls on OSX. This allows the host application to generate traffic without requiring low-level Ethernet bridging support.

On top of these open source components, we have LinuxKit VM which runs containerd and service containers which includes Docker Engine to run service containers. LinuxKit VM is built based on YAML file. The docker-for-mac.yml contains an example use of the open source components of Docker for Mac. The example has support for controlling dockerd from the host via vsudd and port forwarding with VPNKit. It requires HyperKit, VPNKit and a Docker client on the host to run.

Sitting next to Docker CE service containers, we have kubelet binaries running inside LinuxKit VM. If you are new to K8s, kubelet is an agent that runs on each node in the cluster. It makes sure that containers are running in a pod. It basically takes a set of PodSpecs that are provided through various mechanisms and ensures that the containers described in those PodSpecs are running and healthy. The kubelet doesn’t manage containers which were not created by Kubernetes.On top of Kubelet, we have kubernetes services running. We can either run Swarm Cluster or Kubernetes Cluster. We can use the same Compose YAML file to bring up both the clusters side by side.

Peeping into LinuxKit VM

Curious about VM and how Docker for Mac CE Edition actually look like?

Below are the list of commands which you can leverage to get into LinuxKit VM and see kubernetes services up and running. Here you go..

How to enter into LinuxKit VM?

Open MacOS terminal and run the below command to enter into LinuxKit VM:

$screen ~/Library/Containers/com.docker.docker/Data/com.docker.driver.amd64-linux/tty

Listing out the service containers:

Earlier the ctr tasks ls used to list the service containers running inside LinuxKit VM but in the recent release, namespace concept has been introduced, hence you might need to run the below command to list out the service containers:

$ ctr -n services.linuxkit tasks ls
TASK                    PID     STATUS
acpid                   854     RUNNING
diagnose                898     RUNNING
docker-ce               936     RUNNING
host-timesync-daemon    984     RUNNING
ntpd                    1025    RUNNING
trim-after-delete       1106    RUNNING
vpnkit-forwarder        1157    RUNNING
vsudd                   1198    RUNNING

How to display containerd version?

Under Docker for Mac 18.05 RC1, containerd version 1.0.1 is available as shown below:

linuxkit-025000000001:~# ctr version
Client:
  Version:  v1.0.1
  Revision: 9b55aab90508bd389d7654c4baf173a981477d55

Server:
  Version:  v1.0.1
  Revision: 9b55aab90508bd389d7654c4baf173a981477d55
linuxkit-025000000001:~#

How shall I enter into docker-ce service container using containerd?

ctr -n services.linuxkit tasks exec -t --exec-id 936 docker-ce sh
/ # docker version
Client:
 Version:      18.05.0-ce-rc1
 API version:  1.37
 Go version:   go1.9.5
 Git commit:   33f00ce
 Built:        Thu Apr 26 00:58:14 2018
 OS/Arch:      linux/amd64
 Experimental: false
 Orchestrator: swarm

Server:
 Engine:
  Version:      18.05.0-ce-rc1
  API version:  1.37 (minimum version 1.12)
  Go version:   go1.10.1
  Git commit:   33f00ce
  Built:        Thu Apr 26 01:06:49 2018
  OS/Arch:      linux/amd64
  Experimental: true
/ #

How to verify Kubernetes Single Node Cluster?

/ # kubectl version
Client Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"9", GitVersion:"v1.9.6", GitCommit:"9f8ebd171479bec0ada837d7ee641dec2f8c6dd1", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2018-03-23T09:38:59Z", GoVersion:"go1.9.4", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}
Server Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"9", GitVersion:"v1.9.6", GitCommit:"9f8ebd171479bec0ada837d7ee641dec2f8c6dd1", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2018-03-21T15:13:31Z", GoVersion:"go1.9.3", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}
/ # kubectl get nodes
NAME                 STATUS    ROLES     AGE       VERSION
docker-for-desktop   Ready     master    26d       v1.9.6
/ #

 

Interested to read further? Check out my curated list of blog posts –

Docker for Mac is built with LinuxKit. How to access the LinuxKit VM
Top 5 Exclusive Features of Docker for Mac That you can’t afford to ignore
5 Minutes to Bootstrap Kubernetes Cluster on GKE using Docker for Mac 18.03.0
Context Switching Made Easy under Kubernetes powered Docker for Mac 18.02.0
2-minutes to Kubernetes Cluster on Docker for Mac 18.01 using Swarm CLI
Docker For Mac 1.13.0 brings support for macOS Sierra, now runs ARM & AARCH64 based Docker containers
Docker for Mac 18.03.0 now comes with NFS Volume Sharing Support for Kubernetes

 

Did you find this blog helpful?  Feel free to share your experience. Get in touch with me at twitter @ajeetsraina.

If you are looking out for contribution/discussion, join me at Docker Community Slack Channel.

Top 5 Exclusive Features of Docker For Mac That You Can’t Afford to Ignore

Estimated Reading Time: 7 minutes

 

Docker for Mac 18.04.0 CE Edge Release went GA early last month. This was the first time Kubernetes version 1.9.6 & Docker Compose 1.21.0 was introduced under any Docker Desktop edition. ICYMI – Docker for Mac VM is entirely built with LinuxKit, hence this was the first release which enabled the RBD and CephFS kernel modules under LinuxKit VM. In case you’re new to RBD, the linux kernel RBD (rados block device) driver allows striping a linux block device over multiple distributed object store data objects. Usually the libceph module takes care of that.This release brought a number of fixes around upgrades from Docker for Mac 17.12, synchronisation between CLI `docker login` & GUI login, support for AUFS and much more.

Under this blog post, I will talk about top 5 exclusive and very useful features of Docker of Mac that you can’t afford to miss out.

#1: Docker for Mac support Docker Swarm, Swarm Mode & Kubernetes

Starting from Docker for Mac 17.12 CE Edge Release, Docker Inc introduced a standalone Kubernetes server and client, as well as Docker CLI integration. The Kubernetes server runs locally within your Docker instance, is not configurable, and is a single-node cluster.

One of the most anticipated feature introduced with this release was the Kubernetes server running within a Docker container on your local system. When Kubernetes support is enabled, you can deploy your workloads, in parallel, on Kubernetes, Swarm, and as standalone containers. Enabling or disabling the Kubernetes server does not affect your other workloads.

You can use Docker for Mac to test single-node features of swarm mode introduced with Docker Engine 17.12, including initializing a swarm with a single node, creating services, and scaling services. Docker “Moby” on Hyperkit serves as the single swarm node. You can also use Docker Machine, which comes with Docker for Mac, to create and experiment a multi-node swarm.

While testing Kubernetes, you may want to deploy some workloads in swarm mode. You can use the DOCKER_ORCHESTRATOR variable to override the default orchestrator for a given terminal session or a single Docker command. This variable can be unset (the default, in which case Kubernetes is the orchestrator) or set to swarm or kubernetes.

 

Check out my blog post:

2-minutes to Kubernetes Cluster on Docker for Mac 18.01 using Swarm CLI

 

#2:  You can use the same Docker Compose to build Swarm & Kubernetes Cluster

Yes, you read it correct. Starting from Docker for Mac 17.12, Docker introduced a new type called “Stack” under compose.docker.com. This object, that you can create with kubectl or more easily with docker stack deploy, contains the compose file.Behind the scene, a controller watches for stacks and create/update corresponding kubernetes objets (deployments, services, etc). The job of the controller is to reconcile the stacks (stored in the api-server or crd) with k8s native object.

The docker stack deploy manages to deploy to K8s. It convert docker-compose files to k8s manifests (something like kompose) before deployment. Let me showcase an example which shows how one can use the same YAML file to build Swarm Mode as well as K8s cluster.

Clone the Repository

$git clone https://github.com/ajeetraina/docker101

Change to the right location

$cd docker101/play-with-kubernetes/examples/stack-deploy-on-mac/

Example-1 : Demonstrating a Simple Web Application

Building the Web Application Stack

$docker stack deploy -c docker-stack1.yml myapp1

Verifying the Stack

$docker stack ls

Verifying using Kubectl

$kubectl get pods

Verifying if the web application is accessible

$curl localhost:8083

Cleaning up the Stack

$docker stack rm myapp`

Example:2 – Demonstrating ReplicaSet

Building the Web Application Stack

$docker stack deploy -c docker-stack2.yml myapp2

Verifying the Stack

$docker stack ls

Verifying using Kubectl

$kubectl get pods
Ajeets-MacBook-Air:testenviron ajeetraina$ kubectl get stacks
NAME      AGE
myapp2    22m
Ajeets-MacBook-Air:testenviron ajeetraina$ kubectl get pods
NAME                    READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
db1-d977d5f48-l6v9d     1/1       Running   0          22m
db1-d977d5f48-mpd25     1/1       Running   0          22m
web1-6886bb478f-s7mvz   1/1       Running   0          22m
web1-6886bb478f-wh824   1/1       Running   0          22m
Ajeets-MacBook-Air:testenviron ajeetraina$ kubectl get stacks myapp2 -o yaml
apiVersion: compose.docker.com/v1beta2
kind: Stack
metadata:
  creationTimestamp: 2018-01-28T02:55:28Z
  name: myapp2
  namespace: default
  resourceVersion: "3186"
  selfLink: /apis/compose.docker.com/v1beta2/namespaces/default/stacks/myapp2
  uid: b25bf776-03d6-11e8-8d4c-025000000001
spec:
  stack:
    Configs: {}
    Networks: {}
    Secrets: {}
    Services:
    ..
      WorkingDir: ""
    Volumes: {}
status:
  message: Stack is started
  phase: Available

Verifying if the web application is accessible

$curl localhost:8083

Cleaning up the Stack

$docker stack rm myapp2

An Interesting Read:

5 Minutes to Bootstrap Kubernetes Cluster on GKE using Docker for Mac 18.03.0

#3:  Docker for Mac provides Multi-Architecture Support

Docker for Mac provides binfmt_misc multi architecture support. This means that now you can run containers for different Linux architectures, such as arm, mips, ppc64le, and even s390x.

#4:  Support for NFS Volume sharing under Swarm as well as Kubernetes

With Docker for Mac 18.03 release, NFS Volume sharing support for both Swarm & Kubernetes was introduced. To demonstrate this feature, follow the below steps:

Pre-Requisite:

  • Install Docker for Mac 18.03 and future version
  • Enable Kubernetes under Preference Pane UI

Cloning the Repository

git clone https://github.com/ajeetraina/docker101/
cd docker101/for-mac/nfs

Execute the below script on your macOS system

sh env_vars.sh
sh setup_native_nfs_docker_osx.sh

 +-----------------------------+
 | Setup native NFS for Docker |
 +-----------------------------+

WARNING: This script will shut down running containers.

-n Do you wish to proceed? [y]:
y

== Stopping running docker containers...
== Resetting folder permissions...
Password:
== Setting up nfs...
== Restarting nfsd...
The nfsd service does not appear to be running.
Starting the nfsd service
== Restarting docker...

SUCCESS! Now go run your containers ?

Bringing up Your Application

docker stack deploy -c docker-compose.yml myapp2
 docker stack ls
NAME                SERVICES
myapp2                1
[Captains-Bay]? >  kubectl get po
NAME      READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
web-0     1/1       Running   0          3m
[Captains-Bay]? >  kubectl get svc
NAME         TYPE        CLUSTER-IP   EXTERNAL-IP   PORT(S)     AGE
kubernetes   ClusterIP   10.96.0.1    <none>        443/TCP     1d
web          ClusterIP   None         <none>        55555/TCP   3m
[Captains-Bay]? >  kubectl describe po web-0
Name:           web-0
Namespace:      default
Node:           docker-for-desktop/192.168.65.3
Start Time:     Wed, 11 Apr 2018 23:00:18 +0530
Labels:         com.docker.service.id=up2u-web
                com.docker.service.name=web
                com.docker.stack.namespace=up2u
                controller-revision-hash=web-7dbbf8689d
                statefulset.kubernetes.io/pod-name=web-0
Annotations:    <none>
Status:         Running
IP:             10.1.0.34
Controlled By:  StatefulSet/web
Containers:
  web:
    Container ID:  docker://ec9ad2a3192bdeb0cc5028453310f40fd0ac3595021b070465c4e7725f626d63
    Image:         alpine:3.6
    Image ID:      docker-pullable://alpine@sha256:3d44fa76c2c83ed9296e4508b436ff583397cac0f4bad85c2b4ecc193ddb5106
    Port:          <none>
    Args:
      ping
      127.0.0.1
    State:          Running
      Started:      Wed, 11 Apr 2018 23:00:19 +0530
    Ready:          True
    Restart Count:  0
    Environment:    <none>
    Mounts:
      #{CONTAINER_DIR} from nfsmount (rw)
      /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount from default-token-n8trf (ro)
Conditions:
  Type           Status
  Initialized    True
  Ready          True
  PodScheduled   True
Volumes:
  nfsmount:
    Type:       PersistentVolumeClaim (a reference to a PersistentVolumeClaim in the same namespace)
    ClaimName:  nfsmount-web-0
    ReadOnly:   false
  default-token-n8trf:
    Type:        Secret (a volume populated by a Secret)
    SecretName:  default-token-n8trf
    Optional:    false
QoS Class:       BestEffort
Node-Selectors:  <none>
Tolerations:     node.kubernetes.io/not-ready:NoExecute for 300s
                 node.kubernetes.io/unreachable:NoExecute for 300s
Events:
  Type    Reason                 Age   From                         Message
  ----    ------                 ----  ----                         -------
  Normal  Scheduled              5m    default-scheduler            Successfully assigned web-0 to docker-for-desktop
  Normal  SuccessfulMountVolume  5m    kubelet, docker-for-desktop  MountVolume.SetUp succeeded for volume "pvc-bbdc7903-3dad-11e8-a612-025000000001"
  Normal  SuccessfulMountVolume  5m    kubelet, docker-for-desktop  MountVolume.SetUp succeeded for volume "default-token-n8trf"
  Normal  Pulled                 5m    kubelet, docker-for-desktop  Container image "alpine:3.6" already present on machine
  Normal  Created                5m    kubelet, docker-for-desktop  Created container
  Normal  Started                5m    kubelet, docker-for-desktop  Started container

 

 

#5:  Docker for Mac support context switching from docker-for-desktop to Cloud instances in a matter of a Click

Starting from Docker for Mac 18.02 RC release, the context switching feature was introduced which helped developers and operators to switch from docker-for-desktop to any Cloud environment in just a matter of a “toggle”.

 

I have a detailed blog post published early this year which demonstrates this feature with crystal clear examples. Check it out.

Context Switching Made Easy under Kubernetes powered Docker for Mac 18.02.0

Other attractive features of Docker for Mac 18.04 includes –

  • Docker for Mac VM is entirely built with LinuxKit

How to enter into LinuxKit VM?

$screen ~/Library/Containers/com.docker.docker/Data/com.docker.driver.amd64-linux/tty
/ # cat /etc/issue

Welcome to LinuxKit

                        ##         .
                  ## ## ##        ==
               ## ## ## ## ##    ===
           /"""""""""""""""""\___/ ===
          {                       /  ===-
           \______ O           __/
             \    \         __/
              \____\_______/
/ # cat /etc/os-release
PRETTY_NAME="Docker for Mac"
/ #
linuxkit-025000000001:~# cat /etc/os-release
PRETTY_NAME="Docker for Mac"
linuxkit-025000000001:~# runc list
ID                 PID         STATUS      BUNDLE                                CREATED                          OWNER
000-metadata       0           stopped     /containers/onboot/000-metadata       2018-05-05T06:27:44.345735031Z   root
001-sysfs          0           stopped     /containers/onboot/001-sysfs          2018-05-05T06:27:44.768313965Z   root
002-binfmt         0           stopped     /containers/onboot/002-binfmt         2018-05-05T06:27:45.630283593Z   root
003-format         0           stopped     /containers/onboot/003-format         2018-05-05T06:27:46.341011253Z   root
004-extend         0           stopped     /containers/onboot/004-extend         2018-05-05T06:27:47.08889973Z    root
005-mount          0           stopped     /containers/onboot/005-mount          2018-05-05T06:27:55.334088074Z   root
006-swap           0           stopped     /containers/onboot/006-swap           2018-05-05T06:27:56.486815308Z   root
007-ip             0           stopped     /containers/onboot/007-ip             2018-05-05T06:28:03.894591249Z   root
008-move-logs      0           stopped     /containers/onboot/008-move-logs      2018-05-05T06:28:05.980232896Z   root
009-sysctl         0           stopped     /containers/onboot/009-sysctl         2018-05-05T06:28:06.15775421Z    root
010-mount-vpnkit   0           stopped     /containers/onboot/010-mount-vpnkit   2018-05-05T06:28:06.356833391Z   root
011-bridge         0           stopped     /containers/onboot/011-bridge         2018-05-05T06:28:06.551619273Z   root
linuxkit-025000000001:~# ctr tasks ls
  • Docker for Mac uses raw format VM disks for systems running APFS on SSD on High Sierra by default
  • DNS name docker.for.mac.host.internal should be used instead of docker.for.mac.localhost (still valid) for host resolution from containers.

Did you find this blog helpful?  Feel free to share your experience. Get in touch with me at twitter @ajeetsraina.

If you are looking out for contribution/discussion, join me at Docker Community Slack Channel.

 

Top 10 Reasons why LinuxKit is better than the traditional OS distribution

Estimated Reading Time: 9 minutes

 

“LinuxKit is NOT designed with an intention to replace any of traditional OS like Alpine, Ubuntu, Red Hat etc. It is an open-source toolbox for building fine-tuned Linux-based operating systems that run in containers and hence, lean, portable & secure out-of-the-box.”

                                                                                                                     ~ Collabnix

 

How is LinuxKit different from other available GNU operating system? How is it different from Hashicorp Packer & Cloud instances? Why should I consider LinuxKit? I came across these queries in various community forums and discussion and thought to come up a write-up which talks about the factor which differentiate LinuxKit from other available operating system, tools & utilities.

In case you’re new, LinuxKit is a toolkit for building minimal Linux distributions that is lean, secure and portable. LinuxKit is built with an intention to build a distributions that has just enough Linux to accomplish a task and just do it in a way that is more secure. It uses Moby to build the distribution images and the LinuxKit tool to run them on the local hypervisor, cloud and bare metal environment.

Under this blog post, I will go through 10 good reasons why LinuxKit is better than other available GNU / open source distributions:

1. Smaller in size(< 200MB) compared to GBs size of traditional OS

The idea behind LinuxKit is that you start with a minimal Linux kernel — the base distro is only 35MB — and add literally only what you need. Once you have that, you can build your application on it, and run it wherever you need to. 

                                                                                                                     ~ source 

LinuxKit is not a full host operating system. It primarily has two jobs to accomplish- first to  run containerd containers and secondly, be secure. Linuxkit provides the ability to build an extremely small distribution (~50m) stripped of everything but that which is required to run containers.The init system and all other userland system components (e.g. dhcp, sshd) are containers themselves and as such can be swapped out, or others be plugged in. The whole OS is immutable (unless data volumes are configured), and will run anywhere one finds silicon or a hypervisor: Windows, MacOS, IoT devices, the Cloud etc.The system does not contain extraneous packages or drivers by default. Because LinuxKit is customizable, it is up to individual operators to include any additional bits they may require.

Let us try building LinuxKit ISO out of the minimal.yaml (shown below) which is also available under LinuxKit repository and verify its size.

git clone https://github.com/linuxkit/linuxkit
cd linuxkit && make
cp -rf bin/linuxkit /usr/local/linuxkit

Building LinuxKit ISO

Ajeets-MacBook-Air:examples ajeetraina$  linuxkit build -format iso-bios -name kitiso minimal.yml

This will build up minimal LinuxKit ISO. 

Let us verify its size as shown below:

Ajeets-MacBook-Air:examples ajeetraina$ du -sh * | grep linuxkit.iso 
133M linuxkit.iso
Ajeets-MacBook-Air:examples ajeetraina$ file linuxkit.iso 
linuxkit.iso: DOS/MBR boot sector; partition 1 : ID=0x17, active, start-CHS (0x0,0,1), end-CHS (0x84,63,32), startsector 0, 272384 sectors
Ajeets-MacBook-Air:examples ajeetraina$

 

A Traditional OS, in the other hand, is a complete operating system and includes hundreds and thousands of application programs. 

2. Minimal Provisioning/Boot Time(1.5 – 3 minutes)

LinuxKit hardly takes 1.5 to 3 minutes to get up and running on either local hypervisor/cloud or bare metal system. This is way better than 3 to 5 minutes of provisioning time as compared to traditional OS distribution. LinuxKit is an entirely immutable system, coming in at around 50MB with nothing extraneous to that which is needed to run containers. The root filesystem is read-only, making it stateless and tamper-proof. LinuxKit runs almost everything – onboot processes and continuous services- in a container which makes the boot time quite fast.  Even the init phase – where the OS image will be booted – is configured by copying files from OCI images.

While booting up the minimal LinuxKit ISO, it just took 0.034515sec for the containerd to get booted up.(shown below)

 

3. Build-time Package Updates(LinuxKit) Vs Run-time Package Updates(OS)

LinuxKit uses Moby tool which assembles a set of containerized components into an image. It uses YAML configuration which specifies the components used to build up an image . All components are downloaded at build time to create an image. The image is self-contained and immutable, so it can be tested reliably for continuous delivery. Most importantly – The build itself takes a matter of seconds, and is eminently reproducible, making it an ideal candidate to pass through a CI system. This is definitely an advantage over traditional GNU operating system.

4. Built-in Security(LinuxKit) Vs Base Security(Traditional OS)

LinuxKit allows users to create very secure Linux subsystems because it is designed around containers. All of the processes, including system daemons, run in containers, enabling users to assemble a Linux subsystem with only the needed services. As a result, systems created with LinuxKit have a smaller attack surface than general purpose systems.

LinuxKit is architected to be secure by default. LinuxKit’s build process leverages Alpine Linux’s hardened userspace tools such as Musl libc, and compiler options that include -fstack-protector and position-independent executable output. 

Most importantly, LinuxKit uses modern kernels, and updates frequently following new releases.  LinuxKit tracks new kernel releases very closely, and also follows best practice settings for the kernel configuration from the Kernel Self Protection Project and elsewhere.

The core system components included in LinuxKit userspace are written in type safe languages, such as Rust, Go and OCaml, and run with maximum privilege separation and isolation. LinuxKit’s build process heavily leverages Docker images for packaging. Of note, all intermediate build images are referenced by digest to ensures reproducibility across LinuxKit builds. Tags are mutable, and thus subject to override (intentionally or maliciously) – referencing by digest mitigates classes of registry poisoning attacks in LinuxKit’s buildchain. Certain images, such as the kernel image, is usually signed by LinuxKit maintainers using Docker Content Trust, which guarantees authenticity, integrity, and freshness of the image.

If you compare it with the traditional OS, many kernel bugs usually lurk in the codebase for years. Therefore, it is imperative to not only patch the kernel to fix individual vulnerabilities but also benefit from the upstream security measures designed to prevent classes of kernel bugs.

5. Container & Cloud Native at the same time

It is important to note that Linuxkit is built with containers, for running containers. Linuxkit today is supported on local hypervisor, cloud and bare metal system. The same minimal LinuxKit ISO image which is container native runs well on Cloud platform like Google Cloud Platform, Amazon Web Services & Microsoft Azure flawlessly.

If we talk about the traditional OS available, the distribution is usually customized by Cloud vendors to fit into the Cloud which is quite different from the one which is available for bare metal system. For example, An Amazon Machine Image (AMI) or preemptive Google Cloud instances etc.

6. Batteries included but removable/swappable

LinuxKit is built on the philosophy of “batteries included but swappable”.  Everything is replaceable and customizable under LinuxKit. That’s one of the unique feature in LinuxKit. The YAML format specifies the components used to build an ISO image. This is made possible via the moby tool which assembles a set of containerized components into an image. Let us look at the various YAML file which talks about how this philosophy really works:

  • Minimal YAML file to build LinuxKit OS
  • YAML file which builds LinuxKit OS with SSH Enabled

If you compare the above YAML file with the minimal YAML, just SSHD service containers has been added and hence new LinuxKit ISO can be booted up. You can find various other YAML files under this link.

7. Immutable in Production

Lots of companies – small or very large – have used immutability as a core concept of their infrastructure.Immutable infrastructure basically consists of immutable components which are actually  replaced for every deployment, rather than being updated. These components are usually started from a common image that is built once per deployment and can be tested and validated. The common image can be built through automation, but doesn’t have to be. Important to note that immutability is independent of any tool or workflow for building the images. Its best use case is in a cloud or virtualized environment.

Why is it important?

Immutable components as part of your infrastructure are a way to reduce inconsistency in your infrastructure and improve the trust into your deployment process. 

Toolkit like LinuxKit have made building immutable components very easy. Together with existing cloud infrastructure, it is a powerful concept to help you build better and safer infrastructure. 

8. Designed to be managed by external tooling

LinuxKit today can be managed flawlessly with popular tooling like Infrakit, Terraform or CloudFormation. It uses external tooling such as Infrakit or CloudFormation templates to manage the update process externally from LinuxKit, including doing rolling cluster upgrades to make sure distributed applications stay up and responsive.

Updates may preserve the state disk used by applications if needed, either on the same physical node, or by reattaching a virtual cloud volume to a new node.

Soon after Dockercon 2017 Austin, I wrote a blog post on how Infrakit & LinuxKit work together for building immutable infrastructure.

Why Infrakit & LinuxKit are better together for Building Immutable Infrastructure?

If you want to know how LinuxKit & Terraform can work together, you should look at this link too.

 

9. Enough to bootstrap distributed applications

LinuxKit is designed for building and running clustered applications, including but not limited to container orchestration such as Docker or Kubernetes. It is obvious that in the production environment, most of the users will use a cluster of instances, usually running distributed applications, such as etcdDockerKubernetes or distributed databases. LinuxKit provides examples of how to run these effectively, largely using the tooling likeinfrakit, although other machine orchestration systems can equally well be used, for example Terraform or VMWare.

LinuxKit is gaining momentum in terms of  a toolkit for building custom minimal, immutable Linux distributions. Integration of Infrakit with LinuxKit help users  to build and deploy custom OS images to a variety of targets – from a single vm instance on the mac (via xhyve / hyperkit, no virtualbox) to a cluster of them, as well as booting a remote ARM host on Packet.net from the local laptop via a ngrok tunnel.

 

10. Eliminates Cloud-provides specific Base Image variance

If we talk about Cloud, one serious challenge is that each vendor has differentiated IP invested in how they handle certain aspects of their cloud infrastructure. It is not enough to just provision n-number of servers;what IT ops teams need is a simple and consistent way to declare the number of servers, what size they should be, and what sort of base software configuration is required. Linuxkit solves this problem of base software configuration issue by allowing users to build a stripped down version of traditional OS based on their own requirement.

As said earlier, LinuxKit is not here to replace Alpine OS. LinuxKit uses the minimalist Alpine Linux distribution by default as the foundation of its official container images, and will continue to do so in future. Alpine is seen as an ideal all-purpose generic base for running heavy-lifting software like Redis and Nginx within containers. You can also switch Alpine for Debian/ubuntu/centos, if you wish.

Interested to learn more about LinuxKit, head over to these series of articles.

Did you find this blog helpful?  Feel free to share your experience. Get in touch @ajeetsraina

If you are looking out for contribution/discussion, join me at Docker Community Slack Channel.